Tales of an Underdog
eartheld:

wnderlst:

Kirkstone Pass, Lake District | Chris Newham

mostly nature

eartheld:

wnderlst:

Kirkstone Pass, Lake District | Chris Newham
mostly nature

candle-lighted:

rain appreciation post

Runners have an unspoken bond that’s unmatched in any other sport. We’re trusting of complete strangers. In every other group I’ve joined in my life, trust is earned gradually—it has to be proven. With most runners I’ve met, trust is assumed. We support each other immediately and without hesitation. More than any other group, my running friends are fiercely loyal. I don’t know why “good people run,” but I have a guess. We build relationships outside in nature, forcing us to leave the stress, anxiety, and societal pressures behind for just an hour or so. We leave the drama at work, family stress, and we just focus on the run. All we need to have a good time is a pair of shoes.

Joanna Reuland, marketing manager for the San Francisco Marathon in an interview here. (via malloryrunsthis)

SOOO true

(via angel-likes-running)

Robin Williams didn’t die from suicide. I only just heard the sad, sad news of Robin Williams’s death. My wife sent me a message to tell me he had died, and, when I asked her what he died from, she told me something that nobody in the news seems to be talking about.

When people die from cancer, their cause of death can be various horrible things – seizure, stroke, pneumonia – and when someone dies after battling cancer, and people ask “How did they die?”, you never hear anyone say “pulmonary embolism”, the answer is always “cancer”. A Pulmonary Embolism can be the final cause of death with some cancers, but when a friend of mine died from cancer, he died from cancer. That was it. And when I asked my wife what Robin Williams died from, she, very wisely, replied “Depression”.

The word “suicide” gives many people the impression that “it was his own decision,” or “he chose to die, whereas most people with cancer fight to live.” And, because Depression is still such a misunderstood condition, you can hardly blame people for not really understanding. Just a quick search on Twitter will show how many people have little sympathy for those who commit suicide…

But, just as a Pulmonary Embolism is a fatal symptom of cancer, suicide is a fatal symptom of Depression. Depression is an illness, not a choice of lifestyle. You can’t just “cheer up” with depression, just as you can’t choose not to have cancer. When someone commits suicide as a result of Depression, they die from Depression – an illness that kills millions each year. It is hard to know exactly how many people actually die from Depression each year because the figures and statistics only seem to show how many people die from “suicide” each year (and you don’t necessarily have to suffer Depression to commit suicide, it’s usually just implied). But considering that one person commits suicide every 14 minutes in the US alone, we clearly need to do more to battle this illness, and the stigmas that continue to surround it. Perhaps Depression might lose some its “it was his own fault” stigma, if we start focussing on the illness, rather than the symptom. Robin Williams didn’t die from suicide. He died from Depression*. It wasn’t his choice to suffer that.

Tom Clempsom  (via emomoz)
Not a word, Derek Tao

17 miles today. 11 for the workout averaging 6:46 with warm up and cool down, then 6 in the evening observing a lightning storm to the south and a run in with suburban deer. Doing this after a long day at work might not have been the best idea… I was bonking with about 2 or 3 miles left in the run. Nonetheless, the Great White Calendar God was offered 17 miles for the day, and more to come.

Next week is a 4 mile time trial on Wednesday. Curious to see how that goes.

matvrity:

Omg i wanna live dere

matvrity:

Omg i wanna live dere

The Second Day of Training

Of course, everyone posts on the first day, but it’s the second day where training actually begins… especially for us.

Yesterday, we hit 10 miles in 67 minutes flat (after a few hundred feet of climbing at 6000 ft. elevation) which was supposed to be an easy day, but we’ve all heard the story before: some guys go away for the summer, hammer out some miles, and think they have to prove themselves for the team. 

Thus, today, I started with the Kenyan, at a blistering 8:45 pace.Still averaged 7:45 by the end of the day and normally I would scoff at that pace; yet the Kenyan philosophy rings loud in my mind “Easy days easy, hard days hard.” I’ve known this my entire career, yet pride takes a strong foothold in everyone when it comes to paces and mileage. As Kara Goucher once tweeted, “Be patient little lion, you will have plenty of time to roar.”

Workout tomorrow, three groups doing some form of 90/90 intervals. Everyone is still sore in their glutes after some baseline testing the athletic dept. decided to rush us through. Tomorrow will be exciting for sure.

theoregonscout:

I love the sweet sound of snow crunching under my feet. I love snowshoeing with arms bared to the bright sun. I love the salty taste of salami and cheese after a few hours of hard work.

theoregonscout:

I love the sweet sound of snow crunching under my feet. I love snowshoeing with arms bared to the bright sun. I love the salty taste of salami and cheese after a few hours of hard work.

sixsecondshigh:

More great photos from European Athletics of the recent championships. Can be found on their Facebook page.

foresity:

SIERRA DE LAS NIEVES || Pedro Dominguez

foresity:

SIERRA DE LAS NIEVES || 
runnersclub:

It’s still winter around here #merrellargentin #outperform
merrelloutside

runnersclub:

It’s still winter around here #merrellargentin #outperform

merrelloutside